My Deloitte Journey Begins…

In 2017, I graduate with a bachelors degree in business and commerce from Western Sydney University and begin a new journey as a graduate in one of the big four accounting firms in the world – Deloitte. I am both excited and humbled by this opportunity and will endeavour to bring forth the same energy and enthusiasm towards this role as I have done in each of my roles in the past. In addition, I will continue mentoring and coaching junior tennis players and hope that I can continue to connect with professionals who can inspire and support both my students and myself to become all we can be! – Originally posted on 20 January 2017

I began my role as a graduate at the accounting firm in March 2017. I can recall being so excited about this opportunity ever since I was accepted into the program over 1 year ago! Has it really been that long? Wow

I feel as though it is only appropriate to reflect on this new chapter in my life, having been with the firm for three months, by commenting on what I believe are the challenges, positives and negatives of this role going forward into the future.

NEGATIVES

  • The inability to predict my workload
  • Not being my own boss

CHALLENGES

  • Getting at least 7 hours of sleep per day
  • Ensuring that I can continue to mentor and coach junior tennis players and adults throughout the week
  • Being social (since I am an introvert, naturally)

POSITIVES

  • The ability to work amongst likeminded individuals
  • Making an impact that matters
  • Learning new skills on a daily basis

It’s quite clear to see, just from my quick reflection on my experience at Deloitte thus far, that there is no perfect role, situation or environment. That goes for both your work and personal life. We will always face challenges and have experiences that are both positive and negative.

In my opinion, the way to keep winning at life is to learn from the negatives, embrace the positives and face the challenges. There really is nowhere to hide from them because they are the recurring themes in everything we do. I will keep you all posted 🙂

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3rd Year Anniversary at Premier Tennis Academy

I cannot believe how fast three years has gone by at Premier Tennis Academy! Time flies when you’re having fun 🙂

Over the past three years, I have mentored and coached junior tennis players to help them become better competitors in this sport. During this time, I have both reconnected and become acquainted with some amazing people that I have learned a great deal from and have helped me grow in confidence as a leader, mentor and coach. There have been some amazing results for my students both on and off the court. I am truly grateful for this year.

In 2017, I graduate with a bachelors degree in business and commerce from Western Sydney University and begin a new journey as a graduate in one of the big four accounting firms in the world – Deloitte. I am both excited and humbled by this opportunity and will endeavour to bring forth the same energy and enthusiasm towards this role as I have done in each of my roles in the past. In addition, I will continue mentoring and coaching junior tennis players and hope that I can continue to connect with professionals who can inspire and support both my students and myself to become all we can be!

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Tennis Tips You Don’t Want To Miss

When you think of past and current tennis champions such as Mary Pierce, Martina Hingis, Anna Kournikova, Monica Seles, Jennifer Capriati, Jelena Jankovic, Maria Sharapova, Sabine Lisicki, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Tommy Haas, Max Mirnyi, they all share one thing in common. Not only are they all grand slam champions, but they have achieved most of their success under the tutelage of a man named Nick Bollettieri. The IMG academy based in Bradenton, Florida was established by Nick Bollettieri and has been the breeding ground for multiple grand slam champions, particularly during the 1990’s and early 2000’s. He is arguably one of the best tennis coaches the game has seen. I’d never miss an opportunity to hear some tennis tips from this man and I’d recommend his latest set of tips to you.

Nick Bollettieri – Tuesday Tennis Tips (25 November 2015)

1. OK. You’re about to play a match against an opponent that you’ve never seen before. During the first 5 minutes of the warm-­‐up try to develop a strategy:
• How do they hit their groundstrokes; flat, spin, aggressive, moderate?
• Are they comfortable at the net?
• Check out their first and second serve.
• How effective is their overhead? If you back them up, is the overhead still as effective?
• Do they move in and back as effectively as they move from side to side?
Using your warm-­‐up as an opportunity to evaluate their proficiency at these important parts of the game will allow you to develop a viable strategy before the first point begins.

2. Can you out-­‐hit your opponent? First, you’ve got to be honest with yourself and put your ego in your back pocket. Otherwise, you’re making a fatal mistake. If the answer is NO, try to slow down the speed of the rallies with some lobs, drop shots and short angles. Try to avoid playing into your opponents’ hand. As a rule, at the club level, nobody is good at everything. Find the something that they’re not so good at!

3. There’s an old saying that you should “Change a losing game.” Accept what your opponent can do well and make small adjustments to your game plan. Don’t forget, the object is to win. If the way want to win isn’t working, then win the way that you don’t want. But WIN!

4. Don’t tell me that you’ll play the best that you can. I want to hear that you will play to win. This attitude won’t allow you to accept second place. PLAY TO WIN!

5. Surprise your opponent! Your weekly opponents know your game. They know exactly what you can – and cannot do! Why not come up with a drop shot, attack the net or attack their second serve? SURPRISE YOUR OPPONENT. DO THE UNEXPECTED!

6. Andre Agassi said, “The next point is the most important point.” You can’t change what happened, but you can try to make sure it doesn’t happen again! Clear your mind and stop feeling sorry for yourself. Stop looking for excuses and get ready for the next point. It is the most important point!

7. Any negative look can provide fuel for your opponent. Scream at yourself? Throw your racquet? Don’t empower your opponent by displaying this negativity. Losing is easy. Don’t make it any easier for your opponent to defeat you! Let that opponent – and every opponent to follow, know that if they’re going to win, it’s gonna take all day!

Source: https://m.facebook.com/nickbollettieri/

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The Pursuit of Becoming a Tennis Champion

The pursuit of becoming a tennis champion is a journey that consists of numerous highs and lows. In my opinion and after my own experiences, the lows certainly outweigh the highs, particularly if you have your sights on big time tennis. This is the nature of the sport of tennis. It’s not about how many highs or lows you experience or the positive and negative experiences, rather treating every experience as simply being part of the bigger picture. I tell my students on many occasions that if they want to be successful, they must stay in the present moment, because that is the only way they will truly embrace all that is around them and grow as an athlete and person.

Having said that, there should also be a long-term outlook for every athlete and it should be based on the following things;

  1. Work hard and smart
  2. Seek improvement
  3. Focus on your health
  4. Be happy
  5. Be mentally fit for competition.

In addition to the above, you should keep your eye on your short-term goals and focus on achieving them, because they are the pathway towards achieving the long-term goals. The long-term goals will predominantly require tournament schedule planning and ranking analysis.

Let’s take a real-life example, say your short-term goal is to get fit before a big tournament, so you hire a fitness trainer and spend 6-8 weeks working on a specific fitness program in addition to your on-court training. Learn from the experience and move onto the next goal. This could be to better your serve, so spend 20min at the end of each on-court session working on the serve, in addition to your current on-court activities and fitness maintenance schedule. Learn from the experience and move onto the next goal. This could be to work on your in-game tactics during matches. One way to help you here is to play games and tie-breakers in addition to your on court-training and fitness maintenance schedule. It would be ideal to have your coach watch you and guide you in terms of in-game tactics to improve on. So as you can see, you have now tackled 3 short-term goals of improving your fitness, serve and tactics in a smart and productive way. This is how you can work hard and smart.

Do you think that an athlete can do this alone? I don’t think it is possible in the long-run. It takes a team of professionals behind every step of the way for any athlete. It is not a walk in the park at all!

If that sounds like much, or you’re thinking ‘Alison, you must be exaggerating”, let’s take a look into a day in the life of young Rafa Nadal, as he explains in his own words whilst unveiling his new tennis academy in Mallorca, Spain.

“Attend School from 9am to 12pm. Tennis Training from 12-2pm. Attend School from 2-5:30pm. Soccer Training from 5:30-7pm. Tennis Training from 7-9pm. Dinner and Homework from 9pm onwards.”

Are you still asking, what does it take to become a tennis champion?

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Right Place & Right Time

Let’s travel down memory lane for a moment, to a time when I was competing in Canterbury, New Zealand at a junior ITF event. This was 10 years ago, wow!

It was the first day of the event and I was walking around the club, observing matches that were in progress. I happened to notice someone who was seated behind a match court. He looked familiar, like I had seen him before. I was 99% sure that he was the same coach who I had seen on television during a highly publicised match between Andy Roddick and Younes El Aynaoui at the QF stage of the Australian Open in 2003. It set the record at the time for the longest match in open history. I knew I just had to find out, so I did.

Yes, I was right. It was Tarik Benhabiles, the French Algerian ATP player turned coach. What was he doing in New Zealand? Well, at the time he was no longer coaching Andy Roddick and was now working with another American. I was just so happy to meet him and wanted to spend every day with him during that event. He was very humble and down to earth. My mother accompanied me to the event and he asked me to introduce him to her and I thought that was a very nice gesture. He even bought her a coffee and started to speak Arabic with her. Tarik watched my matches that week and gave me very good feedback. He mentioned that he hadn’t coached female players but he would make an exception for me, so we exchanged contact details and years later I would meet him again and train with him at his academy in Florida, USA.

I guess, you can say it’s all about who you know, but being at the right place at the right time is also important.

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1st Year Anniversary at Premier Tennis Academy

I felt deep down that 2014 was going to be a great year, and I was right!

There was something special about the way I acquired my role as Tennis Coach at Premier Tennis Academy. I was working in Texas, USA at the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch and happened to bump into a coach who was travelling with a group of his students. This coach happened to be an Australian, who owned and operated a Tennis Academy in my hometown of Sydney. It must have been fate because we lived only a short distance from one another however, we met each other thousands of km’s away in another country. After a few short meetings and on court sessions, I got the job!

It’s been a year that has challenged me in such a great way. I feel like a stronger Tennis Coach and person. Bring on 2015!

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